How to Make Caramel Sauce - Handle the Heat
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How to Make Caramel Sauce

By Tessa Arias
  |  
June 29th, 2022

How to Make Caramel Sauce WITHOUT a candy thermometer! Takes just 15 minutes and is SO much better than store-bought. Step-by-step instructions and baking tips included to help you learn how to make the perfect homemade caramel recipe.

Yield: 1 1/4 cups

Prep Time: 5 minutes

Cook: 10 minutes

Tessa's Recipe Rundown...

Taste: Deeply sweet and I love adding sea salt for salted caramel. Homemade caramel sauce is no joke 1,000 times better than the store-bought variety. Texture: Lusciously thick and rich. Ease: Much easier than you probably think. If you've never made it before I've included everything you need to see and know to make a successful batch of caramel! Appearance: Who wouldn't want to receive a jar of this liquid gold?! Pros: Fun and satisfying way to make a homemade goodie. Cons: Caramel can be a little tricky to clean. If you get any stubborn sugar or caramel stuck to your pot simply pour some water into it and bring it to a boil. It'll dissolve anything! Would I make this again? I've made this recipe countless times.

You’re going to love this homemade salted caramel sauce.

When I was in culinary school, we spent days on caramel, candies, and other sugar work. It’s all very detail-oriented, and the smallest change in temperature can make a huge difference.

Don’t start making candy if you have to use the restroom, because you cannot walk away from the stove even for a few minutes! I learned that the hard way.

Luckily, there is a way to make caramel sauce that is super streamlined and simple, with no special equipment required. This caramel sauce recipe, which you can add salt to for salted caramel sauce, actually comes from my cookbook Cookies & Cream: Hundreds of Ways to Make the Perfect Ice Cream Sandwich.

I included it as a sort of bonus recipe for readers who really wanted to amp up their ice cream sandwiches. Caramel isn’t just good with ice cream though, it’s good on EVERYTHING. And knowing how to make caramel sauce is a trick that’ll always come in handy.

Seriously, this stuff is liquid gold. You’re going to want to drizzle it all over cheesecake, brownies, cinnamon rolls, apple pie, swirl it into your favorite baked good batters, or even add a spoonful to your morning coffee. You’ll probably just want to eat it straight up with a spoon. It makes a great gift for neighbors, teachers, and friends too!

What’s your favorite way to enjoy caramel?

Step-by-Step: How to Make Caramel Sauce

1. Pour the sugar into a dry, medium-sized stainless steel saucepan, and cook the sugar over medium heat.

2. Swirl the pan occasionally, until the sugar melts and begins to turn a deep amber color.

This will take about 5 to 6 minutes, depending on your pan and stovetop.

3. Turn off the heat and whisk in the butter until melted. Whisking constantly, gradually add the cream. Whisk until the mixture is smooth.

The caramel may seize. If clumps of sugar form, continue heating on low heat until they melt back into a smooth sauce. The caramel will bubble here, so take caution not to allow your hand too close to the mixture. Use only heatproof utensils and a pot deep enough to catch any bubbles.

4. Remove from heat and pour through a fine strainer into a heatproof container. Stir in the salt if using.

Let cool until warm and thick, and then enjoy! If you want even thicker caramel, pop it in the fridge where it’ll be stored long term anyways.

If you make and enjoy this caramel sauce, be sure to snap a picture and share it on Instagram, tagging #handletheheat, so we can all see your creations!

Tips for Homemade Caramel Sauce Recipe

What is Caramel?

Sugar! Caramel is simply sugar that has been melted and then cooked until it browns (caramelized). Salted caramel is the same, just with the addition of salt.

Caramel comes in a variety of different forms: from the hard-wrapped candies grandmas always seem to have in their purse, the chewy type on the outside of caramel apples, to the sauces Starbucks uses to make their caramel macchiatos and frappuccinos! This recipe is formulated to be a sauce, so you can use it to make your coffee taste deliciously decadent, top your cheesecake with it, put it on ice cream or brownies – the list is endless.

What is Caramel made of?

Only 4 ingredients to make the best salted caramel sauce:

Butterscotch vs. Toffee vs. Caramel

Butterscotch is typically made with brown sugar instead of granulated sugar. Toffee is also often made with brown sugar but is cooked to a higher temperature so it crystallizes and hardens as it cools.

Check out my Butterscotch Sauce and Homemade Toffee Bits recipes.

How to Make Caramel Sauce:

There are two basic methods of making caramel – wet and dry – the basic difference between the two methods being water. Essentially both methods are heating sugar, then adding fat (butter and cream, typically); but the wet uses water to dissolve the sugar faster. The drawback with wet caramel is that it can easily crystallize on the sides of the pan, which is disastrous for your caramel. The method I prefer is the dry method. It takes a tiny bit longer, and it can burn easily (you’ll need to watch very carefully for that!), but it’s pretty foolproof beyond that.

What is the Texture of This Salted Caramel?

When it comes off the heat, this caramel sauce will be liquidy and runny. As it cools, it will thicken. You will need to store the caramel sauce in the refrigerator, so it will harden even more once chilled. Just bring it back to room temperature and microwave before drizzling or dipping!

Note: Add 1-2 tablespoons more cream to thin it more before serving, if preferred.

Do I Need a Candy Thermometer for Homemade Caramel Sauce?

No, you do not need a candy thermometer for this recipe. I have included lots of sensory indicators throughout, so you can visually check when to add the next ingredient! My biggest tip here though is to stay put and be patient. Do not step away from the stove while the caramel is cooking, and pay close attention to the color each step of the way, so you don’t burn the sugar.

Tools for Making Salted Caramel Sauce:

  • Make sure you’re using a light-colored stainless steel pot. This is important for two reasons. Firstly, it conducts heat appropriately and will ensure the caramel cooks evenly. Secondly, the light color will help you be able to tell when the sugar has cooked to the right amber color, rather than too dark or too light because you couldn’t tell in a dark pan!
  • A wooden spoon or heat proof silicone spatula to mix the butter and heavy cream into the hot sugar. Don’t use something plastic that can melt, or something metal that might burn your hand!
  • A whisk
  • A jar or airtight container for storing leftover caramel sauce

Why did my caramel seize?

If too many bits of sugar get stuck to the side of the pan, they will harden and can cause the caramel to seize or become gritty or grainy when you add in the butter and/or the cream. Prevent this by using your hand to gently swirl the sugar around as it melts instead of using a utensil to stir it. This will help prevent sugar from getting stuck to the sides of the pan and clumping.

How to fix a seized caramel sauce:

Crystallized caramel sauce can usually be rescued! Just melt the chunks of hardened caramel back into the sauce over a very low heat, then strain with a fine mesh strainer before using.

Can I Use This for Caramel Apples?

No. This recipe won’t work for caramel apples as it’s too thin and it won’t coat the apples (though I am working on a caramel apple recipe – keep your eyes peeled!!). It is delicious though with sliced apples, drizzled on or as a sweet dip!

How to Eat Caramel Sauce:

The possibilities and flavors are endless! Here are some of my favorite treats, which you can top with this caramel sauce for even more deliciousness.

How to Store Salted Caramel:

Once cooled entirely, place the caramel sauce in an airtight glass container (a mason jar is perfect) and refrigerate for up to 2 weeks. Microwave for 20-30 seconds to bring back to drizzling/dipping consistency.

Can you Freeze this Caramel Sauce?

Yes, you can freeze the caramel sauce! Freeze in an airtight container for up to 3 months. Thaw in the refrigerator overnight before using, then reheat in the microwave or on the stove top on low heat until it reaches drizzling or dipping consistency.

Recipes that use Salted Caramel Sauce:

How to make
Homemade Caramel Sauce

Yield: 1 1/4 cups
Prep Time: 5 minutes
Cook Time: 10 minutes
Total Time: 15 minutes
How to Make Caramel Sauce WITHOUT a candy thermometer! Takes just 15 minutes and is SO much better than store-bought. Step-by-step instructions and baking tips included to help you learn how to make the perfect homemade caramel recipe.

Ingredients

  • 1 cup (200 grams) granulated sugar
  • 5 tablespoons (71 grams) unsalted butter
  • 1/2 cup plus 1 tablespoon heavy cream
  • 1 teaspoon Fleur de Sel or flaky sea salt (optional)

Directions

  1. In a dry, medium-sized stainless steel saucepan, cook the sugar over medium heat, swirling the pan occasionally, until the sugar melts and begins to turn a deep golden color, about 5 to 6 minutes. Turn off the heat and whisk in the butter until melted. Whisking constantly, gradually add the cream. Whisk until the mixture is smooth.

  2. The caramel may seize. If clumps of sugar form, continue heating on low heat until they melt back into a smooth sauce. Remove from heat and pour through a fine mesh strainer into a heatproof container. Stir in the salt if using. Let cool until warm and thick. Use or store in an airtight container in the fridge for up to 2 weeks. Let come to room temperature or warm in the microwave for 20-30 seconds to bring back to drizzling/dipping consistency.

Recipe Video

Course : Dessert
Cuisine : American

This post was originally published in February 2014 and updated in June 2022 with new photos and recipe improvements. Photos by Joanie Simon.

Tessa Arias
Author: Tessa Arias

I share trusted baking recipes your friends will LOVE alongside insights into the science of sweets. I'm a professionally trained chef, cookbook author, and cookie queen. I love to write about all things sweet, carb-y, and homemade. I live in Phoenix, Arizona (hence the blog name!)

Tessa Arias

About Tessa...

I share trusted baking recipes your friends will LOVE alongside insights into the science of sweets. I'm a professionally trained chef, cookbook author, and cookie queen. I love to write about all things sweet, carb-y, and homemade. I live in Phoenix, Arizona (hence the blog name!)

Find Tessa on  

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Recipe Rating




  1. #
    Kathy P — October 26, 2022 at 1:19 pm

    Absolutely delicious and easy to make!!

  2. #
    Rita — October 13, 2022 at 3:32 am

    once you have put the cake in the freezer what is the best way to defrost a piece? my husband takes my baked goods to work for his lunch and break times. Are we to defrost in the frig or just take a piece of this cake to work and let it defrost in his lunch bag? Thank you for all of your recipes and tips, much appreciated! Rita

    • #
      Kiersten @ Handle the Heat — October 13, 2022 at 10:54 am

      Hi Rita! I’m not sure which cake you’re referring to, as this comment was posted on a caramel sauce post, but we typically suggest wrapping slices of cake individually before freezing, and thawing in the fridge overnight before serving. If the cake doesn’t need to be refrigerated (i.e it isn’t iced with cream cheese frosting or similar), you should just be able to thaw in his lunch bag, and it should be good to eat by lunchtime! I hope that helps! 🙂

  3. #
    Natalie — August 6, 2022 at 1:42 am

    Hi! I’d love to make this to use for some salted caramel recipes and have a question about storage *after* topping baked goods.
    I see it’s rec to store in the fridge. If I use it to drizzle on a cookie or cupcake, does that item then need to be stored in the fridge?
    I need a caramel which is shelf stable for a day or two on my baked goods. TIA!

    • #
      Kiersten @ Handle the Heat — August 8, 2022 at 1:36 pm

      Hi Natalie! We do recommend refrigerating our caramel sauce. I would suggest drizzling the caramel on just before serving, if at all possible, to keep the caramel safe to eat, and still enjoy with anything you’re drizzling it on! I hope that helps 🙂

  4. #
    Robin — July 20, 2022 at 10:45 am

    This was the easiest recipe I have ever tried for making caramel sauce. I brought it in to the office with a half gallon of vanilla bean ice cream and it was a hit! I did add some fleur de sel at the end and all the caramel addicts were in heaven! This recipe is a keeper and one I will use frequently. Thank you.

    • #
      Kiersten @ Handle the Heat — July 21, 2022 at 1:29 pm

      Yay! So happy to hear that you and your coworkers enjoyed this caramel so much, Robin! Glad the recipe was easy to follow 🙂

  5. #
    Steven carroll — July 15, 2022 at 3:28 pm

    This is the worst caramel recipe.

    • #
      Kiersten @ Handle the Heat — July 18, 2022 at 9:34 am

      Hi Steven! I’m sorry to hear you did not like this caramel! It sounds like you may have encountered some issues while making this. If you would like to respond with some more information, we would love to try to help and troubleshoot, so your caramel can turn out beautifully in the future!

  6. #
    GINNY SPEARMAN — July 8, 2022 at 7:38 pm

    This is a great recipe.
    My question is how to make sugar-free Carmel?

    • #
      Kiersten @ Handle the Heat — July 12, 2022 at 12:37 pm

      Hi Ginny! I’m happy to hear you like this recipe! Unfortunately, we do not test recipes with sugar substitutes. I do not believe this recipe will work with anything other than real sugar. Of course, you are more than welcome to experiment and see if you can create something you’re happy with! Good luck 🙂

  7. #
    Tracey — December 31, 2021 at 12:27 am

    Amazing thanks Tessa! Will be a topping for your cheesecake bars for NYE! Delicious.

  8. #
    Katie — December 7, 2021 at 7:14 pm

    This is so much better than store bought! Thank you!

    • #
      Emily — December 8, 2021 at 4:36 pm

      Glad you loved this recipe!

  9. #
    MeKenzie — November 24, 2021 at 12:40 pm

    Wow. Amazing salted caramel recipe. Can’t wait for my family to try it at Thanksgiving tomorrow!

  10. #
    Julina — October 6, 2021 at 5:15 pm

    Foolproof and yum

  11. #
    Janis — September 17, 2021 at 7:29 am

    Can this caramel sauce be used to make caramel apples, or is it too thin?

    • #
      Emily — September 17, 2021 at 10:49 am

      Hi Janis! It’s a little too thin for that, though dipping the apples into the caramel sauce or drizzling it all over apple slices is absolute heaven!

  12. #
    Natalie — January 25, 2021 at 9:06 am

    This recipe is amazing and simple too. First attempt and its perfect

    • #
      Tessa — January 25, 2021 at 2:19 pm

      Hooray!

  13. #
    KC Schwartz — January 22, 2021 at 2:37 pm

    So I tried this recipe and it turned out really burnt. I used a stainless steel pan to make it in I kept waiting for every single bit of the sugar to burn the golden color. Just wondering if it doesn’t all have to be dissolved before you move onto putting in the butter. Im gonna try again! As soon as I get more cream!

  14. #
    Donna D Lewis — December 11, 2020 at 12:45 pm

    Tessa makes everything seem so easy. Well, guess what? This recipe IS! Just made my first batch of caramel ever and following her directions it turned out delicious! So. Should I just drink it or wait till it cools and make my own caramel apples?

    • #
      Tessa — December 14, 2020 at 1:38 pm

      Ooh caramel apples sound amazing! So glad you tried this recipe out.

  15. #
    Trang — August 31, 2020 at 9:24 am

    Hi Tessa, I usually premake caramel sauce for cooking. But no matter how careful I am or how long I wait, the sugar always seize and crystalized around the rim right above the already melted sugar. How do I avoid this or help it melt back into the sugar without over burning the sugar that had turned golden brown?

  16. #
    Sharon — June 25, 2020 at 9:16 pm

    I tried to make this twice. First time it took about 15 minutes to melt and the final product tasted burnt. Then I tried it again in a bigger pot so the bottom surface was bigger, hoping that would work. Nope. It took 10 minutes to melt and the final product still tasted burnt. I’m typically a pretty good cook and have no idea why mine took so much longer to melt.
    Going to buy some caramel sauce tomorrow for your cheesecake. I give up.
    I wasn’t planning on putting a rating on it but it won’t let me post the comment without.

  17. #
    Sue Ann Larson — January 5, 2020 at 5:47 am

    Can I substitute regular sea salt for flaky?

  18. #
    Lynette — December 13, 2019 at 11:37 am

    Could I use brown sugar?

  19. #
    Lynette — December 13, 2019 at 11:35 am

    Could I use brown sugar?

  20. #
    kris — November 27, 2019 at 1:24 pm

    Hi! Should I use cold heavy cream or let it come to room temp?

    Thank you!

    Sincerely,
    Trying this recipe for Thanksgiving dessert 🙂

  21. #
    Naomi — November 26, 2019 at 12:35 pm

    This was so easy and sooooooo good. Why would anyone buy caramel sauce. Thank you so much for sharing this recipe.

  22. #
    Chelsea — July 9, 2019 at 11:48 am

    Looking forward to trying this recipe!! Question though; how do you think this caramel recipe will behave when baked into a cheesecake? Do you think it will be sturdy enough? Thanks!

  23. #
    Sandy — April 12, 2019 at 5:26 am

    I made this sauce yesterday. I was a bit frustrated by my process, but in the end I was successful and it is delicious! You see, I have an electric stove. The process is much harder. My sugar took at least 15-20 minutes to get to a syrupy point. When I stirred in the butter and cream, it was ridiculously clumped. But I got out my whisk and persevered. It smoothed out very nicely after I put it back on the burner. But there was quite a bit in the bottom and sides of the pan that I couldn’t get to mix in. I would definitely say it was worth the process though!

  24. #
    David Wynn — December 15, 2018 at 6:42 am

    As a tip, I keep a large bowl or casserole dish filled with ice water when I am melting sugar for a safety precaution. As you know, the heightened danger when cooking sugar is its ability to keep burning when it touches skin. By having the ice water available, I am able to immediately cool the sugar if it were to accidentally contact my skin. Thanks for all you do. Impressive website.

  25. #
    Susan — September 17, 2018 at 3:37 pm

    Hi,
    I was just wondering if it is a good idea to double or triple the recipe?

  26. #
    Cybele — April 22, 2018 at 7:55 am

    Looks like a delicious, straightforward Andy streamlined recipe for caramel. What’s the yield? Thanks for sharing the recipe!

  27. #
    Alane — January 7, 2018 at 7:24 pm

    It took two tries for me. I think the first time I cooked the sugar too long (thought it was supposed to be a deep brown :o\) and the sauce ended up having a weird burnt taste. The 2nd time I cooked the sugar just until it melted and was brown then took it off the heat, and it turned out just fine. So, lesson learned, be careful not to over cook the sugar!

    Thanks so much for sharing your recipes!!! :o)

  28. #
    Lilly — October 14, 2017 at 6:23 pm

    Have you tried using honey to make this caramel sauce? Was wondering if you could substitute it for the sugar?

  29. #
    Sandy — October 18, 2016 at 5:53 pm

    Oh my! I just made this caramel sauce this afternoon. I’ve never had the process go so smoothly — both literally and figuratively! I can’t wait to serve this later this week on cheesecake when our family gets together for dinner! Thanks so much for making it so simple, Tessa. 🙂

  30. #
    Cori Dary — October 17, 2016 at 11:20 am

    Hi Tessa! I made this caramel sauce recipe yesterday for the salted caramel apple sheet cake, which was absolutely amazing. When I made the caramel sauce, it tasted bitter. I still used it for the cake because I figured with all the sugar in the glaze everything would work out fine. But, I want to know how I can make the sauce better. I’m guessing that I overcooked it, but I removed the sugar from the heat as soon as it was dissolved and there was nothing burnt in the pan. My sauce looked quite a bit darker than yours too. Thanks in advance for the help! You’re great!

  31. #
    plasterer bristol — May 12, 2016 at 6:19 am

    Mm delicious, this turned out just right. Thanks for sharing.

    Simon

  32. #
    Brindy — December 25, 2015 at 12:49 am

    Hi Tessa I’m a big fan of yours as are all my weekly tasters ( husband, kids, brothers, and sister in law). I made this caramel sauce nondairy and it came out finger lickin good. I subbed marg for the butter and nondairy whip topping for the heavy cream. ( not very healthy, I know, but I make it up in other areas, like mime made organic baby food.) I was just wondering if it would be possible to freeze the sauce, I’m a big freezer person. Thank you again

  33. #
    Laurel — July 4, 2015 at 6:31 pm

    Oh boy, I really need new glasses or something.
    Everything was going well, up till the cream. I went a-whiskin’, and at first it seemed smooth, but as I finished pouring in the cream it seized. I followed your tips, got it all but a bit melted back together, then added my fleur de sel and it tasted amazing! Can’t wait to put it over some apple crisp a la mode!
    Well I’m just rereading your recipe now, and NOW I see you only put HALF a cup of cream plus one tablespoon–I used a whole cup. *facepalm*
    Oh well, it still tastes so good; it just probably won’t thicken much. I’ve got it for next time though. 😀

    • #
      Tessa — July 5, 2015 at 9:34 am

      Awh man!! I’ve definitely done stuff like that more times than I can count. At least you’ll never do that again 😉

  34. #
    Susan Westfall — February 25, 2015 at 6:58 am

    I am loving your site and the recipes. I have not made any of them yet but I am collecting them for the day that I will. After all this time I am turning into my Mommy who read recipes and cookbooks the way most people read books. I inherited her cookbooks-some I kept and some I have passed to my children. All of my daughters have developed what my oldest calls “the family illness”-collecting books (all kinds) and kitchen gadgets.

  35. #
    Oliver — January 13, 2015 at 12:42 pm

    Ok after reducing it again to a thick sauce, I swirl in the butter. It was looking the same as your picture but as I tasted it, it has no caramel flavor. I think the lemon juice killed it.

    • #
      Tessa — January 13, 2015 at 1:00 pm

      Hi! Not sure why you used lemon juice – I don’t call for it in this recipe!

  36. #
    Oliver — January 13, 2015 at 12:25 pm

    The Lemon Juice reacted with the cream and curlded it. It’s now watery and the scrambled egg looking cream is floating on top. I’m straining it and reducing it.

  37. #
    Oliver — January 13, 2015 at 12:15 pm

    The lemon juice reacted with the cream and it curlded!!!!

  38. #
    Lyndsay Johnson — December 19, 2014 at 9:38 am

    Thanks so much for posting this!! The video was so helpful. I made a vegan version with Earth Balance and Almond Milk (I have a dairy allergy). My first batch was less thick than yours, but I am going to keep working with it. It definitely takes a few times to learn when to take the sugar off the heat without having an overcooked taste. But this method works better than all the others I have tried. I love that it doesn’t crystalize in the fridge. YUM!

    • #
      Tessa — December 20, 2014 at 4:41 pm

      Wonderful, Lynsday! Thanks for your helpful tip for making the recipe dairy-free.

  39. #
    IRENA — November 20, 2014 at 2:15 pm

    vypadá to skvěle, zítra hned zkusím, vřele děkuji za recept

  40. #
    Laura R — July 30, 2014 at 7:21 pm

    An ice cream snack attack led me to this recipe and it turned out so great and it really is so easy! I recently stumbled upon your site and I absolutely love it, thanks for all the awesome recipes!

    • #
      Tessa — July 30, 2014 at 8:23 pm

      That’s so awesome! Thanks so much 🙂

  41. #
    ash — July 22, 2014 at 3:13 pm

    hi i m going to try this can we make it with whole milk instead of cream? plz do answer

    • #
      Tessa — July 23, 2014 at 7:24 am

      No, you should use cream! The caramel needs the fat from the cream.

  42. #
    Hannah — May 4, 2014 at 2:40 pm

    For anyone who was wondering about making this vegan, I used almond milk and Earth Balance and it turned out great!

    • #
      Tessa — May 6, 2014 at 1:42 pm

      Thanks so much for sharing! Good to know.

  43. #
    Amy R. — February 27, 2014 at 11:46 am

    This sauce is fabulous and I love how easy it is! It will replace the difficult caramel filling I was making for the Chocolate Salted Caramel Cupcake recipe from a Pinterest recipe. Your recipe tastes the same but is much easier. This caramel sauce was a huge hit on the Ice Cream Sundae Bar I had for my church dinner last night. Thank You and keep the great recipes coming!

  44. #
    Gaby — February 12, 2014 at 3:12 pm

    You make it look so easy! Homemade caramel is the best!

  45. #
    Crystinna — February 12, 2014 at 10:07 am

    I’ve been making caramel sauce for years and never knew about straining it! Does tempature alter if I use an anodozied pot to stainless? The videos are great by the way 🙂

    • #
      Tessa — February 15, 2014 at 10:47 pm

      Probably a little! I know my anodized pot takes longer to heat than my stainless one.

  46. #
    Florian — February 12, 2014 at 9:41 am

    Concerning making a non-dairy version, I think that almond milk should work fine. I recently made a caramel sauce with whole milk instead of heavy cream. I don’t see why you couldn’t substitute almond milk in this step. If you can find it, califia makes a very creamy almond milk that’s really good.
    I melted the butter and milk together in a sauce pan and then whisked the warm milk/butter into the caramel once it had reached a pale yellow/gold. Instead of turning the heat of, I left it on and thickened the sauce further. The caramelization continues in this step, which is why I added the milk/butter earlier than Tessa’s recipe asks for.

  47. #
    Kevin @ Closet Cooking — February 12, 2014 at 7:56 am

    Homemade is the best and so easy!

  48. #
    Amy — February 12, 2014 at 7:26 am

    This looks like one of the simpler caramel recipes I’ve seen (no candy thermometer, yay!). Is there any way to make it non-dairy? I know almond milk is not a great sub for heavy cream, but can it be done? I think I could use Earth Balance instead of the butter, it’s the heavy cream that has been my stumbling block (in part because I also have to avoid soy and corn, so most non-dairy creamers are a no-go.

    • #
      Tessa — February 12, 2014 at 8:45 am

      I’ve never attempted to make a non-dairy caramel but you could certainly try. I can’t think of any particular reason why it wouldn’t work! If you do try it out please let me know how it goes, I’m sure other readers would love to know if it’s possible!

  49. #
    Taylor @ Food Faith Fitness — February 12, 2014 at 4:35 am

    THANK YOU! The other day I was planning my weekend recipe creations and I wanted to do caramel sauce but I had never done it before…and now I know how! 🙂

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